ArtLex Art Dictionary

 

a diagram of the parts of a nail: head, shank, and point

Ccommon and box nails have heads that are clearly visible after the nails have been driven. They are used for general construction purposes -- framing buildings and situations where appearance is not important.

Box nails -- intended for lighter construction -- are the same length per penny size as common nails, but their shanks and heads are slightly narrower.a common nail

Sizes of Common Nails

 Size number in "d" = pennies

Length in inches

Shank Diameter
in inches and ( gauge )

Head Diameter
in inches

Number per pound
 2 d  1  0.070
( 15 )
 11/64  840
 3 d  1 1/4   0.085
( 14 )
 13/64  530
 4 d  1 1/2   0.1
( 12 1/2 )
 1/4  300
 5 d  1 3/4   0.1
( 12 1/2 )
 17/64  260
 6 d  2   0.115
( 11 1/2 )
 17/64  170
 7 d  2 1/4   0.115
( 11 1/2 )
 17/64  150
 8 d  2 1/2   0.131
( 10 1/4 )
 9/32  105
 9 d  2 3/4   0.131
( 10 1/4 )
 9/32  95
 10 d  3   0.148
( 9 )
 5/16  65
 12 d  3 1/4   0.148
( 9 )
 5/16  60
 16 d  3 1/2   0.162
( 8 )
 11/32  44
 20 d  4   0.195
( 6 )
 13/32  30
 30 d  4 1/2   0.210
( 5 )
 7/16  22
 40 d  5   0.230
( 4 )
 15/32  18
 50 d  5 3/8   0.250
( 3 )
 1/2  14
 60 d  6   0.260
( 2 )
 17/32  10

Finishing nails have much smaller heads that can be concealed after the nails have been driven. These nails are used for applying trim and other areas where appearance is important. Click here to see a diagram of sizes of finishing nails, listing for each size its length, the diameter of its shank and its head, and the number of nails per pound.

Roofing nails have a large head that are intended to hold shingles and are usually galvanized.

Drywall nails look the same as roofing nails but are not galvanized.

 

Return to the article on nails.

Also see construction.

 

ArtLex Art Dictionary

http://www.artlex.com
Copyright © 1996-current year