ArtLex Art Dictionary

 

 

 

AAbout Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French, 1864-1901): Linear.

 

Examples of his work:

 

 

see thumbnail to leftHenri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French, 1864-1901), Albert (René) Grenier (1858-1925), 1887 or 1888, oil on wood, 13 3/8 x 10 inches (34 x 25.4 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightHenri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Englishman (William Tom Warrener, 1861-1934) at the Moulin Rouge, oil and gouache on cardboard, 33 3/4 x 26 inches (85.7 x 66 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftHenri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French, 1864-1901), Divan Japonais, 1893, color lithographed poster, complete: 31 5/8 x 23 7/8 inches (80.3 x 60.7 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY. This poster advertises a cabaret in Montmartre, Paris. In the center sits the famous cancan dancer Jane Avril, whose elegant black silhouette dominates the scene. Lithographed posters proliferated during the 1890s due to technical advances in color printing and the relaxation of laws restricting the placement of posters. Dance halls, café-concerts, and festive street life invigorated nighttime activities. Toulouse-Lautrec's brilliant posters, made as advertisements, captured the vibrant appeal of the prosperous Belle Époque. See Art Nouveau.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightHenri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Sofa, oil on cardboard, 24 3/4 x 31 7/8 inches (62.9 x 81 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftHenri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Madame Thadée Natanson (Misia Godebska, 1872-1950) at the Theater, 1895, gouache on cardboard, 24 1/2 x 29 1/2 inches (62.2 x 74.9 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. See contour lines and theater.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightHenri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Seated Female Clown, Mlle. Cha-U-Kao, 1896, color lithograph in the crayon manner, 20 3/4 x 15 15/16 inches (52.7 x 40.5 cm), Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. Mlle Cha-U-Kao was a dancer, acrobat and clown who worked at the Moulin Rouge, the New Circus and in Parisian cabaret. She was one of the artist's favorite models and he depicted her several times. Here she sits in the circus lobby with legs apart and arms folded, a natural and relaxed posture in which it was convenient to relax the muscles. The artist contrasts the black silhouette of the legs and the red of the bench, while the yellow of the fluffy collar adds a touch which sets off the main color scheme.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftHenri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Émilie, late 1890s, oil on wood, 16 1/4 x 12 3/4 inches (41.3 x 32.4 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightHenri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Mademoiselle Nys, oil on unprimed wood, 10 5/8 x 8 5/8 inches (27 x 21.9 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 


 

 

 

Also see ArtLex pages about other Post-Impressionists:

 

 

 

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